Lengjen

Lengjen (Lingjin) comes from Senegal, some specify this to the Casamance region. The notation information I have from Larry Morris' rhythm catalogue and some email discussion on the Djembe-L mailinglist. Thanks also to Peter Watson, from Nova Scotia, Canada on helping me finish the information. I compared this to a life recording of Lingjin that I once obtained. This recording shows a slow part with song and a quick part, obvious with dance.

Oul bi té lé kon da kon bi té lé, wi son to kon té tele ya kon ti djenna
Oul bi té lé kon da kon bi té lé, ou jon jen songba kon té tele ya kon bi té le
Oul bi té lé kon da kon bi té lé, y son to koun yo ya kon ti djenna
Oul bi té lé kon da kon bi té lé, y ta té korro torro ya kon ti djenna
Oul bi té lé ou kabi kon bi té lé, y ta té ka ma ya kon ti djenna

(The underlined text adjusts to the beat on 1)

Sources:
Written material: Larry Morris, Peter Watson.

WAP-pages / Paul Nas / Last updated 13-06-2004



Slow part
Combination
1 . . 2 . . 3 . . 4 . . 1 . . 2 . . 3 . . 4 . .
K . . . . . . . . . O . . . . . . . . . . . O . .
S O . . . . . . . . . . . O . . . . . . . . . . .

Djembé
T . . . . . . . . S . . T . . . . . . . . S . .
r . . . . . . . . l . . r . . . . . . . l . . .

Djembé changes to:
T . T . . . T . T . . . T . T . . . T . T . . .
r . r . . . r . r . . . r . r . . . r . r . . .

and later:
S . S B T T S . S B T T S . S B T T S . S B T T
r . r l r l r . r l r l r . r l r l r . r l r l

Djembé 2
S . T T . . S . T T . . S . T T . . S . T T . .
r . r l . . r . r l . . r . r l . . r . r l . .

Call (all stop at the grey slap, to pick up in the second part of the call)
S . S . S . s . . T . . S . . . . t t t t t . .
r . r . r . r . . f . . f . . . . l 2 r l r . .

Fast part:
Combination (all bells are my own suggestion)
K . . . . . . . O . O . . . . . . . . . O . O . .
S O . O . . . . . . . . . O . O . . . . . . . . .
x . x . x . x x . x . x x . x . x . x x . x . x

Two doundoun players:

Kenkeni
. . . . . . . O . O . . . . . . . . . O . O . .
x . x . x . x x . x . x x . x . x . x x . x . x

Sangban
O . O . . o o . o . . o O . O . . o o . o . . o
x . x x . x x . x x . x x . x x . x x . x x . x

Sangban alternative
O . O . . . O . O . . . O . O . . . O . O . . .
. . . x . x . . . x . x . . . x . x . . . x . x

Djembé 1
T . S S . T T . S S . T
r . r l . l r . r l . l

Djembé 2
B . B S T T B . B S T T
r . r l r l r . r l r l

Djembé 2a
B . B . T S B . B . T S
r . r . r l r . r . r l

Djembé 2b
S . B S T T S . B S T T
r . r l r l r . r l r l

Djembé 3
T T . T T . T T . T T
. l r . r l . l r . r l

Djembé 4
S . T T . . S . T T . .
r . r l . . r . r l . .

Call (for dancers)
T . T T . T T . T T . . S
f . r l . l r . r l . . f


index | legenda (nl) | legend (en) | inleiding (nl) | introduction (en)

Thanks for taking notice of this interpretation of this rhythm but please consult some real authority's (like Famoudou Konaté and Mamady Keïta) or genuine TEACHERS for further study. Check also the other SITES WITH RHYTHM-NOTATIONS on West African Percussion on the Internet. And share your knowledge and ideas to these WAP-pages and to others.