Yankadi - WAPpages - Sousou seduction dance - Paul Nas
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Yankadi

Last updated on 26 April 2020

A Sousou seduction dance that is played and danced during village festivals, weddings and youth meetings in the villages. The slow Yankadi is danced in two rows; boys and girls face each other (according to Michael Wall: Four couples dance together, essential elements are eye contact, seductive movements and touching each other’s hands and heart region). After a signal, the Makru follows (see there), where dancing is done separately. There is both a binary and a ternary version. Literally Yankadi would mean: ‘Here it is okay!’

A song from Mamoudou ‘Delmundo’ Keita, was on the IDON! Song-list.
Ee waiala, waiala, wonowalio, moe oe che chumba
Kankan nje fonie wofa mama, wonowanio

 

A welcoming song:
ee gyoo, ja la, yankadi la doundoun kam barabo,
min ta mile sangban (doundoun, djembé, kenkeni, balafon,etc) fola ma,
nin d´je wole n´je wa woleko

Another song, one that Kadiatou Sylla sang:
I-Ya, I-Ya-O-Na, I-Ya, I-Ya-O-Na-O,
Nje wa la kabila ke ne ma ni lee ee

 

Instruction for Doundoun
Instruction for Djembé
Dance steps voor Yankadi

Sources

Lessons from Martin Bernhard, Ponda O’Bryan. Dance lessons from Kariatou Sila, Danielle van Son. Song probably from Mamoudou ‘Delmundo’ Keita. Written material van Mamady Keita, Åge Delbanco, Ponda O’Bryan, Paul Janse, Larry Morris, Rafael Kronberger.